An
© copyright       Created and Developed by Thorsen Services
design
website
The net is yours to conquer
An Educational Emergency
The Progress in International Reading and Literacy Study of 2016 report gave the results of one of the most scientifice studies to date - 12,810 pupils were tested in 293 South African schools - on the state of reading in Grade 4 pupils. This study found that 78% of the children tested are functionally illiterate. They sound words but do not understand the meaning of what they have read. 50 countries were tested, and South Africa came last. Up to Grade 4 children learn to read, from Grade 4 they read to learn. The implications of lack of literacy in schools are serious. The ability to read is fundamental to the ability to achieve results in any subject at school. The government has known about this problem for many years, and it’s response has not been to raise the standard of education, but instead to lower it, in order to achieve the desired result of children passing their grades. The path of least resistance is very seldom a good idea, and very definitely reducing standards is not in the best interests of students, the educational system, or the country. Those responsible for education in our government have a lot to answer for. Private school education is not the answer - it works only for children whose parents have resources but the vast majority of children in primary school have no chance of a productive educational environment. What we need to do is create an awareness of this state of affairs and become involved in some constructive manner. Donating books assumes the ability to read - we need to educate the educators at provincial and national levels. It would do no harm to ensure that ALL teachers are suitably qualified and that minimum class sizes are optimised to conform to international standards. Perhaps parents could provide incentives to public school teachers who consistently achieve results in teaching their children to read. Compulsory education is a myth. They may be compelled to teach, but very few of them are compelled to learn. Teaching is the one profession that creates all other professions. And teaching children to read is as important as teaching advanced mathematics.
Hosted By:
Thorsen Services
Many, if not most, of our teachers enter the profession without any enthusiasm for the job. It’s “just a job”, a means of getting a pay cheque at month end. And further education would be completely lost on them. In the public school system there are a number of teachers who derive satisfaction from teaching, a few who do not abuse sick leave privelages, and some who who actually care about the children they teach. These teachers should be honoured and rewarded by the community. As for the rest, is there perhaps some connection between this state of affairs and our abysmal literacy rates in grade 4 and a badly broken school system all the way up to matric?
© copyright             Created and Developed by Thorsen Services        President: Bob Thorsen   Vice President: Trevor Thorsen
design
Thorsen Services
The net is yours to conquer
website
Links Links Language Matters Language Matters
An Educational Emergency
Please see our Desktop site
The Progress in International Reading and Literacy Study of 2016 report gave the results of one of the most scientifice studies to date - 12,810 pupils were tested in 293 South African schools - on the state of reading in Grade 4 pupils. This study found that 78% of the children tested are functionally illiterate. They sound words but do not understand the meaning of what they have read. 50 countries were tested, and South Africa came last. Up to Grade 4 children learn to read, from Grade 4 they read to learn. The implications of lack of literacy in schools are serious. The ability to read is fundamental to the ability to achieve results in any subject at school. The government has known about this problem for many years, and it’s response has not been to raise the standard of education, but instead to lower it, in order to achieve the desired result of children passing their grades. The path of least resistance is very seldom a good idea, and very definitely reducing standards is not in the best interests of students, the educational system, or the country. Those responsible for education in our government have a lot to answer for. Private school education is not the answer - it works only for children whose parents have resources but the vast majority of children in primary school have no chance of a productive educational environment.
What we need to do is create an awareness of this state of affairs and become involved in some constructive manner. Donating books assumes the ability to read - we need to educate the educators at provincial and national levels. It would do no harm to ensure that ALL teachers are suitably qualified and that minimum class sizes are optimised to conform to international standards. Perhaps parents could provide incentives to public school teachers who consistently achieve results in teaching their children to read. Compulsory education is a myth. They may be compelled to teach, but very few of them are compelled to learn. Teaching is the one profession that creates all other professions. And teaching children to read is as important as teaching advanced mathematics.