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Wildlife Conservation
There are an estimated three Rhinos killed every two days in the Kruger National Park. This is a huge improvement on previous year’s estimates of three Rhinos killed every day.
Rhinoceros are killed for their horns which are bought and sold on the black market. They are used by some cultures for ornamental or traditional medicinal purposes. By weight rhino horns cost as much as gold on the black market. The Times of January 4 2017 p7 headline: Poaching: Blow the horns.  KZN reserves see 40% increase in number of Rhino slaughtered in 2016.
161 Rhino were poached in 2016 at state and private and private reserves in KZN compared to 116 the year before. Fight for Rhinos Raising funds and awareness to secure a future for rhinos.
Saint-Gobain Gyproc (SA) (makers of RhinoBoard & RhinoLite) have donated Three Million Rands (one Million Rands per year over the period 2017, 2018 & 2019) to SANParks Honorary Rangers which will go towards training and buying much needed equipment in the field for rangers, and for support of the Air Wing and Veterinary Wildlife Services of SANParks.  This is a magnificent gesture.  (Goodthingsguy.com 2017-05-05) DefenceWeb reported on Dec 9, 2016, that a wide area surveillance system has been taken into use in the Kruger National Park.  Known as the Postcode Meerkat, in recognition of funding for it coming from the People’s Postcode Lottery in the United Kingdom.  It is the first time technology of this type has been applied in a counter poaching role in a bushveld environment.  Postcode Meerkat comprises of a suite of of radar and electro-optic sensors that detect, classify, monitor and track humans moving in the park over a wide area. This will further reduce poaching in the Kruger Park. There are many initiatives to combat rhino poaching.  If the park’s borders could be made secure it would be much more difficult for poachers to infiltrate or get anything out of the park.  Secure fencing all around the park will be a major project, with human and electronic surveillance of the fence a high priority.  The fence would need to be electrified on the Eastern side.  A double fence around the entire park is required, with a dirt road in between for security vehicles.  Tactile sensors and beams are needed to detect movement on the fence. Poachers have been given heavy sentences in the courts, but they shouldn’t even survive an attempt to get in to the Kruger Park.   Read about Killing for Profit - Exposing the Illegal Rhino Horn Trade.  The book is available from Takealot.com in South Africa (eBook from R86 and paperback R206) or Amazon.com (Kindle $10.25 and Paperback $25.00). Defenceweb reports (2017-03-27) that the Kruger National Park is no longer using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to combat poaching.  Due to their small size and weight, they are not able to carry sophisticated payloads and as a result did not detect any suspected poachers during the trial period.
© copyright             Created and Developed by Thorsen Services        President: Bob Thorsen   Vice President: Trevor Thorsen
design
Thorsen Services
The net is yours to conquer
website
Links Links
Wildlife Conservation
There are an estimated three Rhinos killed every two days in the Kruger National Park. This is a huge improvement on previous year’s estimates of three Rhinos killed every day.
Rhinoceros are killed for their horns which are bought and sold on the black market. They are used by some cultures for ornamental or traditional medicinal purposes. By weight rhino horns cost as much as gold on the black market. The Times of January 4 2017 p7 headline: Poaching: Blow the horns.  KZN reserves see 40% increase in number of Rhino slaughtered in 2016.
161 Rhino were poached in 2016 at state and private and private reserves in KZN compared to 116 the year before. Fight for Rhinos Raising funds and awareness to secure a future for rhinos.
Saint-Gobain Gyproc (SA) (makers of RhinoBoard & RhinoLite) have donated Three Million Rands (one Million Rands per year over the period 2017, 2018 & 2019) to SANParks Honorary Rangers which will go towards training and buying much needed equipment in the field for rangers, and for support of the Air Wing and Veterinary Wildlife Services of SANParks.  This is a magnificent gesture.  (Goodthingsguy.com 2017-05-05) DefenceWeb reported on Dec 9, 2016, that a wide area surveillance system has been taken into use in the Kruger National Park.  Known as the Postcode Meerkat, in recognition of funding for it coming from the People’s Postcode Lottery in the United Kingdom.  It is the first time technology of this type has been applied in a counter poaching role in a bushveld environment.  Postcode Meerkat comprises of a suite of of radar and electro-optic sensors that detect, classify, monitor and track humans moving in the park over a wide area. This will further reduce poaching in the Kruger Park. There are many initiatives to combat rhino poaching.  If the park’s borders could be made secure it would be much more difficult for poachers to infiltrate or get anything out of the park.  Secure fencing all around the park will be a major project, with human and electronic surveillance of the fence a high priority.  The fence would need to be electrified on the Eastern side.  A double fence around the entire park is required, with a dirt road in between for security vehicles.  Tactile sensors and beams are needed to detect movement on the fence. Poachers have been given heavy sentences in the courts, but they shouldn’t even survive an attempt to get in to the Kruger Park.   Read about Killing for Profit - Exposing the Illegal Rhino Horn Trade.  The book is available from Takealot.com in South Africa (eBook from R86 and paperback R206) or Amazon.com  (Kindle $10.25 and Paperback $25.00). Defenceweb reports (2017-03-27) that the Kruger National Park is no longer using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to combat poaching.  Due to their small size and weight, they are not able to carry sophisticated payloads and as a result did not detect any suspected poachers during the trial period.