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Wildlife Conservation
Save the Whales (founded 1977)
Faroe Islanders may soon need licenses to participate in traditional whale hunts. The whale slaughter, that dates back to when Viking settlers arrived on this archipelago of 18 islands halfway between Iceland and Norway, continues in the Faroe Islands even after Faroese health authorities in 2008 warned against consumption. The chief physician for the Faroese Department of Occupational Medicine and Public Health, Pál Weihe, and the islands’ chief medical officer, Høgni Debes Joensen, warned that pilot whales are contaminated with high levels of mercury and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), as well as DDE, a breakdown product of the insecticide DDT. Consumption has been linked to Parkinson’s disease in adults, impaired immunity in children, and compromised fetal development. The physicians recommended that pilot whale meat shouldn’t be consumed by humans. Whale meat consumption has gone down considerably since then, but the slaughter, in which entire schools of whales are wiped out at a time, has continued. It is not clear is why the Faroese government allows the whale slaughter to continue, knowing that it supplies households with meat and blubber containing some of the world’s most dangerous toxins.
Greenpeace has been instrumental in fighting illegal commercial whaling.  Japan, Norway and Iceland continue to ignore a 1986 moratorium on commercial whaling. Every year these three countries kill thousands of whales, selling their meat on the black market.
© copyright             Created and Developed by Thorsen Services        President: Bob Thorsen   Vice President: Trevor Thorsen
design
Thorsen Services
The net is yours to conquer
website
Links Links
Wildlife Conservation
Faroe Islanders may soon need licenses to participate in traditional whale hunts. The whale slaughter, that dates back to when Viking settlers arrived on this archipelago of 18 islands halfway between Iceland and Norway, continues in the Faroe Islands even after Faroese health authorities in 2008 warned against consumption. The chief physician for the Faroese Department of Occupational Medicine and Public Health, Pál Weihe, and the islands’ chief medical officer, Høgni Debes Joensen, warned that pilot whales are contaminated with high levels of mercury and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), as well as DDE, a breakdown product of the insecticide DDT. Consumption has been linked to Parkinson’s disease in adults, impaired immunity in children, and compromised fetal development. The physicians recommended that pilot whale meat shouldn’t be consumed by humans. Whale meat consumption has gone down considerably since then, but the slaughter, in which entire schools of whales are wiped out at a time, has continued. It is not clear is why the Faroese government allows the whale slaughter to continue, knowing that it supplies households with meat and blubber containing some of the world’s most dangerous toxins. Greenpeace has been instrumental in fighting illegal commercial whaling.  Japan, Norway and Iceland continue to ignore a 1986 moratorium on commercial whaling. Every year these three countries kill thousands of whales, selling their meat on the black market.
Save the Whales (founded 1977)