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Wildlife Conservation
Faroe Islanders may soon need licenses to participate in traditional whale hunts. The whale slaughter, that dates back to when Viking settlers arrived on this archipelago of 18 islands halfway between Iceland and Norway, continues in the Faroe Islands even after Faroese health authorities in 2008 warned against consumption. The chief physician for the Faroese Department of Occupational Medicine and Public Health, Pál Weihe, and the islands’ chief medical officer, Høgni Debes Joensen, warned that pilot whales are contaminated with high evels of mercury and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), as well as DDE, a breakdown product of the insecticide DDT. Consumption has been linked to Parkinson’s disease in adults, impaired immunity in children, and compromised fetal development. The physicians recommended that pilot whale meat shouldn’t be consumed by humans. Whale meat consumption has gone down considerably since then, but the slaughter, in which entire schools of whales are wiped out at a time, has continued.
It is not clear is why the Faroese government allows the whale slaughter to continue, knowing that it supplies households with meat and blubber containing some of the world’s most dangerous toxins.
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Wildlife Conservation Intro an endangered species still hunted by rogue nations killed for their fins canned hunting still a problem World Wildlife Fund to Links
Wildlife Conservation
Faroe Islanders may soon need licenses to participate in traditional whale hunts. The whale slaughter, that dates back to when Viking settlers arrived on this archipelago of 18 islands halfway between Iceland and Norway, continues in the Faroe Islands even after Faroese health authorities in 2008 warned against consumption. The chief physician for the Faroese Department of Occupational Medicine and Public Health, Pál Weihe, and the islands’ chief medical officer, Høgni Debes Joensen, warned that pilot whales are contaminated with high evels of mercury and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), as well as DDE, a breakdown product of the insecticide DDT. Consumption has been linked to Parkinson’s disease in adults, impaired immunity in children, and compromised fetal development. The physicians recommended that pilot whale meat shouldn’t be consumed by humans. Whale meat consumption has gone down considerably since then, but the slaughter, in which entire schools of whales are wiped out at a time, has continued.
It is not clear is why the Faroese government allows the whale slaughter to continue, knowing that it supplies households with meat and blubber containing some of the world’s most dangerous toxins.