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Wildlife Conservation
Keeping Nature in our Future!
Put the “kind” back into Mankind
The poaching and killing of Rhinos for their horns is despicable. Not enough is done to prevent the destruction of this critically endangered species.  There are five different species of Rhino: the Black Rhino, the Greater One-Horned Rhino, the Java Rhino, the Sumatran Rhino and the White Rhino. The Javan and the Sumatran are critically endangered.
Sharks are hunted for their fins which are a delicacy in China, where they they are also used in traditional medicine.  Shark fins are usually removed from the shark while it is still alive, and the sharks are then returned to the ocean. Unable to move effectively, they sink to the bottom of the ocean and die of suffocation or are eaten by other predators. Sharks are a danger to bathers on the beachers - Shark Spotters is all about Safety, Conservation, Education and Research.                              More…
Whale hunting  has been banned internationally, however Japan and Norway and Iceland still hunt whales.   In the North Pacific, Japanese whalers can kill up to 200 minke whales, 50 Bryde’s, 100 sei whales and 10 sperm whales under the guise of scientific research.   Norway has set it’s own limits, and is hunting a higher proportion of minke breeding females which could impact upon the long term survival of this species in the North Atlantic. Iceland is targeting minke and fin whales, and in 2010 killed 148 endangered fin whales and 60 minke whales. Whaling and other threats have led to at least five of the 13 great whales being listed as endangered. Whales are killed at sea using explosive harpoons, and the whale can take several minutes to hours to die. The International Court of Justice (ICJ) determined in March 2014 that Japanese whaling is not for scientific purposes, and that country is thus ineligible for a Special Permit which would allow it to continue whaling for scientific research. More…
The Campaign Against Canned Hunting (CACH) is a global NGO dedicated to eradicating the barbaric practice of canned lion hunting, and it’s spin-offs. CACH is proud to announce that it was awarded the Gold Certificate for Winner of the Best Animal Welfare Initiative by World Responsible Tourism at the World Travel week in London.
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Wildlife Conservation Intro  an endangered species still hunted by rogue nations killed for their fins canned hunting still a problem World Wildlife Fund to Links
Wildlife Conservation
Put the “kind” back into Mankind
The poaching and killing of Rhinos  for their horns is despicable. Not enough is done to prevent the destruction of this critically endangered species.  There are five different species of Rhino: the Black Rhino, the Greater One-Horned Rhino, the Java Rhino, the Sumatran Rhino and the White Rhino. The Javan and the Sumatran are critically endangered.
Keeping Nature in our Future!
The Campaign Against Canned Hunting (CACH) is a global NGO dedicated to eradicating the barbaric practice of canned lion hunting, and it’s spin-offs. CACH is proud to announce that it was awarded the Gold Certificate for Winner of the Best Animal Welfare Initiative by World Responsible Tourism at the World Travel week in London.
Whale hunting  has been banned internationally, however Japan and Norway and Iceland still hunt whales.   In the North Pacific, Japanese whalers can kill up to 200 minke whales, 50 Bryde’s, 100 sei whales and 10 sperm whales under the guise of scientific research.   Norway has set it’s own limits, and is hunting a higher proportion of minke breeding females which could impact upon the long term survival of this species in the North Atlantic. Iceland is targeting minke and fin whales, and in 2010 killed 148 endangered fin whales and 60 minke whales. Whaling and other threats have led to at least five of the 13 great whales being listed as endangered. Whales are killed at sea using explosive harpoons, and the whale can take several minutes to hours to die. The International Court of Justice (ICJ) determined in March 2014 that Japanese whaling is not for scientific purposes, and that country is thus ineligible for a Special Permit which would allow it to continue whaling for scientific research. More…
January 2018 Good News (The Economist)
For the natural world, China’s rise may not be so worrisome
International trade in ivory has been banned by the Chinese government since 1990, and internal ivory trade has been banned from the 1st of January 2018, although illegal trade will probably continue. However, Hong Kong’s ivory market is only due to be phased out by 2022. China’s ban seems to be having the desired effect since one third of it’s ivory carving workshops were closed in early 2017. The rest have been closed since the beginning of 2018. The average price of a kilogram of good quality elephant tusk in China has fallen from $2,100 in 2014 to $730 in 2017, and it is likely that the new bans will drive the prices down more. A former basketball star, Yao Ming, has helped cut demand for shark fin soup. Imports of dried fins fell from 4,800 tonnes in 2004 to 20 tonnes in 2014. The government has also banned shark fin soup from official banquets and has also banned the sale of any edible product originating from any endangered species. Miscellaneous Links: Wildlife Conservation Society Wildlife South Africa
The World Wildlife Fund for Nature was formerly named the World Wildlife Fund, which remains its official name in Canada and the United States. The Living Planet Report is published every two years by WWF since 1998; it is based on a Living Planet Index and ecological footprint calculation. It is the world's largest conservation organization with over five million supporters worldwide, working in more than 100 countries, supporting around 1,300 conservation and environmental projects. World Wildlife Fund for Nature (S.A.)
Sharks are hunted for their fins which are a delicacy in China, where they they are also used in traditional medicine.  Shark fins are usually removed from the shark while it is still alive, and the sharks are then returned to the ocean. Unable to move effectively, they sink to the bottom of the ocean and die of suffocation or are eaten by other predators.
Sharks are a danger to bathers on the beachers - Shark Spotters is all about Safety, Conservation, Education and Research.                                                   More…